Category Archives: awards

Kris Bryant is National League Most Valuable Player

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Kris Bryant is the National League’s Most Valuable Player.

This was not close – but unanimous. Bryant has went from mega-prospect, to rookie of the year, to the MVP of the NL in a matter of two short seasons.

Bryant hit .292 with 39 bombs and 102 RBI and a 7.6 WAR in playing all over the diamond, leading the Cubs to their first World Series in forever. It’s Bryant’s versatility that really wins him this award, playing good corner outfield defense, his usual position of third base, and even filling in at first base when Anthony Rizzo needed days off.

Bryant was voted first place for the award on 29 of 30 ballots. He finished second on the lone ballot where he wasn’t ranked first.

Corey Seager (our personal sentimental favorite) finished third behind Daniel Murphy.

Mike Trout named AL MVP for the second time

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Mike Trout is your American League Most Valuable Player – for the second time in baseball history the league MVP is on a team with a losing record.

Trout has led baseball in WAR for the past five seasons. This was a strange year in the American League where the field of Trout, Jose Altuve, Mookie Betts, and David Ortiz all seemed to blend together.

Maybe the case could be made for one of these other players; but Trout certainly was snubbed in other years that he should have won this award. This is a good thing.

A look at his Baseball Reference page is just astounding. It’s a sterling page without glitch; a beautiful categoric organization of data.

Trout amassed 29 home runs with 100 RBI, 123 runs scored, 30 steals, a .441 OBP, .550 slugging (.991 OPS) and nearly a 10 bWAR (9.9). There’s nothing about what he did that’s short of MVP-worthy.

Hats off to Mike Trout. Still the game’s finest player. So good, some people are bored with him.

Managers of the Year Named: Roberts, Francona

The awards at the end of the baseball season are beating the snow on the ground in 2016. While things slow down on the blog here on a day-to-day basis more than before I had two kids; there’s nothing like the itch I get in November for more baseball. And it seems I think about and crave it more in November than any other month with the exception of maybe March.

Today, the big news in the show was the naming of the National League and American League Managers of the Year.

Terry Francona grabs the award in the AL for the Cleveland Indians. No surprise there – he is simply the finest manager in the big leagues today; there isn’t a close second. In a league where I feel that a good manager is often too easily complimented, Francona is one of the few great ones and has a chance to be a legendary one when it’s said and done. He got more out of less better than anyone in the game of baseball in 2016. The Tribe – on paper at least – were nothing to really be afraid of. But they played hard and took a loaded Cubs team to the wire.

Dave Roberts had a bit more to work with, but as a first-year manager for the Los Angeles Dodgers, he was left with a patchwork pitching staff for much of the season and a team that just seemed to out-will their competition on the way to winning the National League West and rolled all the way to the NLCS; stealing two games from the Cubs.

Roberts is just 44, seems to be a spectacular guy character-wise; and could someday see himself in a Francona-type conversation. His players seem to love playing for him and it’s because he’s a polar opposite of a guy like Don Mattingly, who seems to poke and prod and annoy the other big personalities in a clubhouse.

 

Michael Fulmer is named American League Rookie of the Year

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Michael Fulmer has been named American League Rookie of the Year for the Detroit Tigers.

Fulmer went 11-7 in 159 innings flat after beginning the 2016 season in AAA. He logged a 3.06 ERA with 132 strikeouts to to 42 walks issued.

When you’re the Rookie of the Year, you get a post devoted to yourself on the blog. Plus, we like Michael Fulmer. We lucked into him on a flyer in one of our fantasy keeper leagues, and he figures to stay put for a long time on our squad.

Fulmer is the fifth Tiger all-time to win the AL Rookie of the Year Award.

Corey Seager is the National League Rookie of the Year

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Remember as kids, the Dodgers trotted out the Rookie of the Year in the National League every year, it seemed? Mike Piazza last won the award in 1994 and did so unanimously. Today, Corey Seager has joined him.

Seager batted .308 and hit 26 home runs. He set Dodgers rookie records in hits (193), total bases (321), extra-base hits (71), doubles (40) and runs scored (105).

Finishing second was the electrifying Trea Turner of the Washington Nationals, and third was taken by Seager’s teammate Kenta Maeda.

But Seager has energized a weary nation in Los Angeles; a look at the first 184 games of his career are just staggering by the numbers.

Something is said in this video I couldn’t agree more with: Seager got great by being good every single day. This past March I knew little of Seager. My interest wasn’t peaked at that point because I was really digging hard into other young guys at the position around the league.

Some game early in the year within the first two weeks, I had a chance to watch Seager play. The Dodgers were down handily, the game was decided; but he was grinding out tough at bat after tough at bat, conceding nothing. He looked like a very pure, mature, relaxed hitter. I just knew then that he had an approach that would make him special. It seemed he had a slow heart beat. The more I watched him, the more I wanted to watch.

He’s without a doubt one of my favorite players in the game right now. He could easily end up one of my favorite Dodgers ever.

2014 BBA Awards Voting Post

As a member of the BBA (Baseball Blogger’s Alliance), we are required to vote on all awards for the 2014 MLB Season. Here are the categories we are voting on this year:

Connie Mack Award (Manager of the Year)
Willie Mays Award (Rookie of the Year)
Goose Gossage Award (Reliever of the Year)
Walter Johnson Award (Cy Young)
Stan Musial Award (MVP)

Connie Mack Award (Manager of the Year)

National League:
First Place Vote – Clint Hurdle (Pittsburgh)
Second Place Vote- Don Mattingly (Los Angeles)
Third Place Vote – Matt Williams (Washington)

American League
First Place Vote – Mike Scioscia (Anaheim)
Second Place Vote – Ned Yost (Kansas City)
Third Place Vote – Brad Ausmus (Detroit)

Willie Mays Award (Rookie of the Year):

National League:
First Place Vote – Jacob deGrom (New York Mets)
Second Place Vote – Billy Hamilton (Cincinnati)
Third Place Vote – Ender Inciarte (Arizona)

American League:
First Place Vote –Jose Abreu (Chicago White Sox)
Second Place Vote – Dellin Betances (New York Yankees)
Third Place Vote – George Springer (Houston)

Goose Gossage Award (Reliever of the year)

National League:
First Place Vote – Aroldis Chapman (Cincinnati)
Second Place Vote – Craig Kimbrel (Atlanta)
Third Place Vote – Mark Melancon (Pittsburgh)

American League:
First Place Vote – Greg Holland (Kansas City)
Second Place Vote – Zach Britton (Baltimore)
Third Place Vote – Jake McGee (Tampa Bay)

Walter Johnson Award (Cy Young):

National League:
First Place Vote – Clayton Kershaw (Los Angeles)
Second Place Vote –Johnny Cueto (Cincinnati)
Third Place Vote – Adam Wainwright (St. Louis)
Fourth Place Vote – Doug Fister (Washington)
Fifth Place Vote – Zack Greinke (Los Angeles)

American League:
First Place Vote – Felix Hernandez (Seattle)
Second Place Vote – Corey Kluber (Cleveland)
Third Place Vote – Max Scherzer (Detroit)
Fourth Place Vote – David Price (Detroit)
Fifth Place Vote – Chris Sale (Chicago White Sox)

Stan Musial Award (Most Valuable Player):

National League:
First Place Vote – Giancarlo Stanton (Miami)
Second Place Vote – Andrew McCutchen (Pittsburgh)
Third Place Vote – Clayton Kershaw (Los Angeles)
Fourth Place Vote – Anthony Rendon (Washington)
Fifth Place Vote – Jonathan Lucroy (Milwaukee)
Sixth Place Vote – Carlos Gomez (Milwaukee)
Seventh Place Vote – Anthony Rizzo (Chicago Cubs)
Eighth Place Vote – Yasiel Puig (Los Angeles)
Ninth Place Vote – Josh Harrison (Pittsburgh)
Tenth Place Vote – Buster Posey (San Francisco)

American League:
First Place Vote – Mike Trout (Anaheim)
Second Place Vote – Alex Gordon (Kansas City)
Third Place Vote – Nelson Cruz (Baltimore)
Fourth Place Vote – Michael Brantley (Cleveland)
Fifth Place Vote – Josh Donaldson (Oakland)
Sixth Place Vote – Jose Abreu (Chicago White Sox)
Seventh Place Vote – Jose Bautista (Toronto)
Eighth Place Vote – Adam Jones (Baltimore)
Ninth Place Vote – Miguel Cabrera (Detroit)
Tenth Place Vote – Jose Altuve (Houston)

2013 BBA Awards Voting Post

As a member of the BBA (Baseball Blogger’s Alliance), we are required to vote on all awards for the 2013 MLB Season. Here are the categories we are voting on this year:

Connie Mack Award (Manager of the Year)
Willie Mays Award (Rookie of the Year)
Goose Gossage Award (Reliever of the Year)
Walter Johnson Award (Cy Young)
Stan Musial Award (MVP)

 

Connie Mack Award (Manager of the Year):


National League:

First Place Vote – Clint Hurdle (Pittsburgh)
Second Place Vote- Don Mattingly (Los Angeles)
Third Place Vote – Mike Matheny (St. Louis)


American League

First Place Vote – Terry Francona (Cleveland)
Second Place Vote – John Farrell (Boston)
Third Place Vote – Joe Maddon (Tampa Bay)

Willie Mays Award (Rookie of the Year):


National League:

First Place Vote – Yasiel Puig (Los Angeles)
Second Place Vote – Jose Fernandez (Miami)
Third Place Vote – Matt Adams (St. Louis)

American League:
First Place Vote – Wil Myers (Tampa Bay)
Second Place Vote – Chris Archer (Tampa Bay)
Third Place Vote – Oswaldo Arcia (Minnesota)
Goose Gossage Award (Reliever of the year)

National League:
First Place Vote – Craig Kimbrel (Atlanta)
Second Place Vote – Kenley Jansen (Los Angeles)
Third Place Vote – Jason Grilli (Pittsburgh)

American League:
First Place Vote – Koji Uehara (Boston)
Second Place Vote – Mariano Rivera (New York)
Third Place Vote – Greg Holland (Kansas City)


Walter Johnson Award (Cy Young):

National League:
First Place Vote – Clayton Kershaw (Los Angeles)
Second Place Vote – Adam Wainwright (St. Louis)
Third Place Vote – Jose Fernandez (Miami)
Fourth Place Vote – Cliff Lee (Philadelphia)
Fifth Place Vote – Craig Kimbrel (Atlanta)

American League:
First Place Vote – Max Scherzer (Detroit)
Second Place Vote – Yu Darvish (Texas)
Third Place Vote – Hisashi Iwakuma (Seattle)
Fourth Place Vote – Chris Sale (Chicago White Sox)
Fifth Place Vote – Anibal Sanchez (Detroit)
Stan Musial Award (Most Valuable Player):

National League:
First Place Vote – Andrew McCutchen (Pittsburgh)
Second Place Vote – Yasiel Puig (Los Angeles)
Third Place Vote – Paul Goldschmidt (Arizona)
Fourth Place Vote – Yadier Molina (St. Louis)
Fifth Place Vote – Carlos Gomez (Milwaukee)
Sixth Place Vote – Matt Carpenter (St. Louis)
Seventh Place Vote – Jay Bruce (Cincinnati)
Eighth Place Vote – Freddie Freeman (Atlanta)
Ninth Place Vote – Jayson Werth (Washington)
Tenth Place Vote – Joey Votto (Cincinnati)

American League:
First Place Vote – Miguel Cabrera (Detroit
Second Place Vote – Mike Trout (Anaheim)
Third Place Vote – Chris Davis (Baltimore)
Fourth Place Vote – Josh Donaldson (Oakland)
Fifth Place Vote – Manny Machado (Baltimore)
Sixth Place Vote – Robinson Cano (New York)
Seventh Place Vote – David Ortiz (Boston)
Eighth Place Vote – Edwin Encarnacion (Toronto)
Ninth Place Vote – Max Scherzer (Detroit)
Tenth Place Vote – Eric Hosmer (Kansas City)

2012 BBA Award Voting

It’s always a sad part of the baseball season when it gets down to award voting.

I am a member of the Baseball Bloggers Alliance, and the end of the season awards voting is the blogger’s voice in Major League Baseball awards. Here are the awards we’ll be voting on today:

Connie Mack Award (Manager of the Year)
Willie Mays Award (Rookie of the Year)
Goose Gossage Award (Reliever of the Year)
Walter Johnson Award (Cy Young)
Stan Musial Award (MVP)
Connie Mack Award (Manager of the Year)
National League:
First Place Vote – Davey Johnson (Washington)
Second Place Vote- Dusty Baker (Cincinnati)
Third Place Vote – Mike Matheny (St. Louis)

American League

First Place Vote – Buck Showalter (Baltimore)
Second Place Vote – Bob Melvin (Oaklakd)
Third Place Vote – Joe Girardi (New York)
Willie Mays Award (Rookie of the Year)
National League:
First Place Vote – Bryce Harper (Washington)
Second Place Vote – Todd Frazier (Cincinnati)
Third Place Vote – Wade Miley (Arizona)
American League:
First Place Vote – Mike Trout (Anaheim)
Second Place Vote – Yu Darvish (Texas)
Third Place Vote – Jarrod Parker (Oakland)
Goose Gossage Award (Reliever of the year)

National League:
First Place Vote – Aroldis Chapman (Cincinnati)
Second Place Vote – Craig Kimbrel (Atlanta)
Third Place Vote – Joel Hanrahan (Pittsburgh)

American League:
First Place Vote – Jim Johnson (Baltimore)
Second Place Vote – Fernando Rodney (Tampa Bay)
Third Place Vote – Ernesto Frieri (Anaheim)

Walter Johnson Award (Cy Young):

National League:
First Place Vote – R.A. Dickey (New York Mets)
Second Place Vote – Johnny Cueto (Cincinnati)
Third Place Vote – Gio Gonzalez (Washington)
Fourth Place Vote – Cole Hamels (Philadelphia)
Fifth Place Vote – Matt Cain (San Francisco)
American League:
First Place Vote – David Price (Tampa Bay)
Second Place Vote – Jered Weaver (Anaheim)
Third Place Vote – Justin Verlander (Detroit)
Fourth Place Vote – Chris Sale (Chicago White Sox)
Fifth Place Vote – Jim Johnson (Baltimore)
Stan Musial Award (Most Valuable Player):

National League:
First Place Vote – Buster Posey (San Francisco)
Second Place Vote – Andrew McCutchen
Third Place Vote – Ryan Braun (Milwaukee)
Fourth Place Vote – Jay Bruce (Cincinnati)
Fifth Place Vote – Yadier Molina (St. Louis)
Sixth Place Vote – Mike Stanton (Florida)
Seventh Place Vote – Chase Headley (San Diego)
Eighth Place Vote – Joey Votto (Cincinnati)
Ninth Place Vote – Bryce Harper (Washington)
Tenth Place Vote – David Wright (New York Mets)

American League:
First Place Vote – Mike Trout (Anaheim)
Second Place Vote – Miguel Cabrera (Detroit)
Third Place Vote – Robinson Cano (New York Yankees)
Fourth Place Vote – Adrian Beltre (Texas)
Fifth Place Vote – Edwin Encarnacion (Toronto)
Sixth Place Vote – Josh Hamilton (Texas)
Seventh Place Vote – Joe Mauer (Minnesota)
Eighth Place Vote – Adam Jones (Baltimore)
Ninth Place Vote – Torii Hunter (Anaheim)
Tenth Place Vote – Billy Butler (Kansas City)

Diamond Hoggers 2011 BBA Award Vote

Before the season I gave you all my predictions.

Of those I am most proud of, it’s the Brewers (unfortunate) NL Central title. I also said Ryan Braun and Clayton Kershaw would win the NL’s most prestigious awards of NL MVP and NL Cy Young. And don’t forget we elected Ben Zobrist as AL Comeback Player of the Year. How are we looking now? Let’s find out how our final votes work out.

I am a member of the Baseball Bloggers Alliance, and one of the best parts of being in the BBA is that you get a vote for several different seasonal awards around Major League Baseball.

Here are the awards we’ll be voting on today:

Connie Mack Award (Manager of the Year)
Willie Mays Award (Rookie of the Year)
Goose Gossage Award (Reliever of the Year)
Walter Johnson Award (Cy Young)
Stan Musial Award (MVP)

Jay Bruce named National League Player of the Month for May

Jay Bruce (pictured above hitting a 460-foot blast off Jair Jurrjens) has been named National League Player of the Month for the month of May in the National League.

In the month he hit .342 with 12 home runs and 33 RBI. Think about that for a second. We all may go our entire lives and never see 33 RBI’s in a month by a Cincinnati Red again. He slugged .739 and OPS’d 1.140 through May.

The month was filled with hits off some of the best pitchers in the game in some of the biggest spots possible. For anyone who has followed Bruce throughout his career, this was the finest stretch of his career, including the beginning of his career, and the streaks at the end of 2009 and 2010. He’s never been hotter, and I don’t know that we’ve ever seen a guy more locked in, including Adam Dunn in July of 2005.

This was what Bruce has always been capable of. And the scary part is he’s capable of even more than this.

He’s a full fledged monster who cannot be stopped right now. Breaking balls, fastballs, change-ups, inside, outside, low, it simply doesn’t matter right now. He’s straight smoking balls and letting the game come to him.

Diamond Hoggers salutes Jay Bruce for being named NL Player of the Month for May. Keep it going Jay. It’s been a lot of fun this past month.

Diamond Hoggers BBA Award Vote

Recently, I became a member of the Baseball Bloggers Alliance. It’s a really great group of baseball blogs on the internet. One of the best parts of being in the BBA is that you get a vote for several different seasonal awards around Major League Baseball.

I take great pride in having a vote for something like this. I will not allow any bit of homer-ism to factor into my votes. One thing to take into consideration, is that I’ve watched more National League baseball than American League this season; but I obviously follow the sport as closely as humanly possible so I don’t think it will be a factor. Do I think I got more of a glimpse of Cincinnati and Atlanta players than a Yankees or Red Sox fan? Absolutely. It will even out, I’m sure.

The Awards I will be voting on go as follows:

Connie Mack Award (Manager of the Year)
Willie Mays Award (Rookie of the Year)
Goose Gossage Award (Reliever of the Year)
Walter Johnson Award (Cy Young)
Stan Musial Award (MVP)

Connie Mack Award (Manager of the Year)

National League:
First Place Vote – Dusty Baker (Cincinnati)
Second Place Vote- Bobby Cox (Atlanta)
Third Place Vote – Bud Black (San Diego)

American League:
First Place Vote – Ron Washington (Texas)
Second Place Vote – Joe Maddon (Tampa Bay)
Third Place Vote – Ron Gardenhire (Minnesota)

Willie Mays Award (Rookie of the Year)

National League:
First Place Vote – Jason Heyward (Atlanta)
Second Place Vote – Buster Posey (San Francisco)
Third Place Vote – Mike Stanton (Florida)

American League:
First Place Vote – Austin Jackson (Detroit)
Second Place Vote – Neftali Feliz (Texas)
Third Place Vote – Danny Valencia (Minnesota)

Goose Gossage Award (Reliever of the year)

National League:
First Place Vote – Brian Wilson (San Francisco)
Second Place Vote – Billy Wagner (Atlanta)
Third Place Vote – Arthur Rhodes (Cincinnati)

American League:

First Place Vote – Rafael Soriano (Tampa Bay)
Second Place Vote – Joakim Soria (Kansas City)
Third Place Vote – Neftali Feliz (Texas)


Walter Johnson Award (Cy Young)

National League:

First Place Vote – Roy Halladay (Philadelphia)
Second Place Vote –
Ubaldo Jimenez (Colorado)
Third Place Vote – Adam Wainwright (St. Louis)
Fourth Place Vote – Josh Johnson (Florida)
Fifth Place Vote – Tim Hudson (Atlanta)

American League:
First Place Vote – Felix Hernandez (Seattle)
Second Place Vote – David Price (Tampa Bay)
Third Place Vote – Trevor Cahill (Oakland)
Fourth Place Vote – CC Sabathia (New York)
Fifth Place Vote – Jered Weaver (Anaheim)



Stan Musial Award (MVP)

National League:
First Place Vote – Joey Votto (Cincinnati)
Second Place Vote – Carlos Gonzalez (Colorado)
Third Place Vote – Albert Pujols (St. Louis)
Fourth Place Vote –
Adrian Gonzalez (San Diego)
Fifth Place Vote – Roy Halladay (Philadelphia)
Sixth Place Vote – Aubrey Huff (San Francisco)

Seventh Place Vote – Jason Heyward (Atlanta)
Eighth Place Vote – Troy Tulowitzki (Colorado)
Ninth Place Vote –
Jay Bruce (Cincinnati)
Tenth Place Vote – Ryan Zimmerman (Washington)

American League:
First Place Vote – Evan Longoria (Tampa Bay)
Second Place Vote – Josh Hamilton (Texas)
Third Place Vote – Miguel Cabrera (Detroit)
Fourth Place Vote –
Paul Konerko (Chicago AL)
Fifth Place Vote – Carl Crawford (Tampa Bay)
Sixth Place Vote – Robinson Cano (New York AL)

Seventh Place Vote – Delmon Young (Minnesota)
Eighth Place Vote – Jose Batista (Toronto)
Ninth Place Vote –
Joe Mauer (Minnesota)
Tenth Place Vote – Adrian Beltre (Boston)

MVP: Most Valuable Pujols

To no surprise, Albert Pujols is your 2009 National League Most Valuable Player.

Pujols was listed first on all 32 ballots submitted by two writers in each league city to score a perfect total of 448 points, based on the tabulation system that rewards 14 points for first place, nine for second, eight for third and on down to one for 10th.

Pujols, 29, led the league in home runs (47) for the first time in his career and was third in batting (.327) and runs batted in (135). He also topped the NL in runs (124), total bases (374), grand slams (5), extra base hits (93), on-base percentage (.443) and slugging percentage (.658). For the eighth straight year he totaled more walks (115) than strikeouts (64).

Gigantosaur adds to his Hall of Fame resume. He becomes the sixth player in NL history to win the award unanimously. And look at the numbers that he put up. Those are Pujols numbers every year. Absolutely sick.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: he’s the best ballplayer of our lifetime. A joy to watch even though he murders the Cincinnati Reds. He’s one of the few players in the game today that you can be certain your grandkids will know about.

And he’s now a 3-time MVP.

Cliffy Lee's dream season ends with a Cy

Cliff Lee has been named the American League Cy Young award winner for 2008. Lee was without doubt the strongest pitcher in the senior circuit this season and he did it on a team that was not particularly competitive when he wasn’t on the hill; similar to his NL Cy Young counterpart Tim Lincecum.

Lee received 24 of 28 first-place votes. (Roy) Halladay received four first-place votes and 71 points. Two BBWAA members in every AL city voted for the top three pitchers in the league.

Lee started the season fast and never slowed. He was 6-0 after seven starts with a 0.67 ERA. In the past 60 years only two pitchers have had a lower ERA after their first seven starts — Oakland’s Mike Norris at 0.45 in 1980 and the Dodgers’ Fernando Valenzuela at 0.29 in 1981.

Lee won 11 straight decisions from July 11 through Sept. 12. It was the longest winning streak by an Indian since Perry won 15 straight in 1974. On Sept. 1, Lee became the first Indians pitcher since Perry to win 20 games, beating Chicago on a five-hit shutout at Progressive Field.


Cliff Lee proving that he is a lefty horse like this makes watching CC Sabathia get out of town sting just a little bit less. The Indians will depend heavily on Lee if this decade’s version of the feathered warriors are ever going to make good on the promise to win a pennant.

We have to admit, we doubted Lee. We didn’t think he’d hold up all season long. We thought eventually the old Cliff Lee would come back and get pounded–making him an afterthought by the All-Star break. Lee made like a character from Major League and told us to shove it. He was by far the best pitcher in his league this year to any fan without blind eye.